CHEF ANDRIAN’S FOOD AFFAIR

Andrian Ishak is known for deconstructing traditional Indonesian food in the most unorthodox way at his restaurant. However, there’s one popular traditional dish the chef will never want to reinvent.

Andrian Ishak is known for deconstructing traditional Indonesian food in the most unorthodox way at his restaurant. However, there’s one popular traditional dish the chef will never want to reinvent.

ANDRIAN ISHAK is the mastermind behind Namaaz Dining, a popular private dining place that serves molecular gastronomy dishes to its patrons. Here’s a fun fact about him: before he ventures out to become a chef, he was a guitarist in a band.

He ended his music career as soon as he felt that it wouldn’t take him anywhere. He then decided to pursue another creative passion by becoming a chef.

In 2012, his restaurant opened doors to food lovers; Namaaz Dining is now among the pioneers of the molecular gastronomy trend in Indonesia.

Andrian’s vision for Namaaz is simple; he wants to give people a new perspective and experience in trying out Indonesian food through a multi-sensory dining experience.

While he himself has “creatively presented” almost all popular Indonesian food from pempek (fish cake) to kue cubit (mini pancake) at his place, Andrian says his favorite Indonesian food is the ubiquitous martabak manis (sweet pancake available with various fillings).

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For Andrian, who believes that cooking should be first and foremost a fun affair,  the cooking technique of martabak is very simple but it produces a very interesting dough texture.

He confesses that the dish also holds a place so special in his heart that he has no desire in presenting changed or deconstructed martabak dish.

“It’s more of a sentimental value that I have whenever I eat martabak,” says Andrian who mentions British celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal as someone who has inspired him greatly to learn molecular cooking.

“When I started out as a musician, I learned the skill to play guitar from my neighbor who was very good at it. At that time I had no money to pay him, in exchange, he asked me to bring a martabak every time I came over.

“I ended up having a special interest with the sweet snack and wanted to cook it on my own so I didn’t have to buy it in order to get a guitar lesson.”


Written by FoodieS June 21, 2016.

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